The Universe Loves Everyone

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Martin Luther King Day 2018 – Making America Great Again — Views from the Edge

I have to believe deep in my heart that we shall overcome someday. To do less would be to die before I die.

via Martin Luther King Day 2018 – Making America Great Again — Views from the Edge

Grateful

Bountiful

“Every moment of your life is infinitely creative and the universe is endlessly bountiful.  Just put forth a clear enough request, and everything your heart desires must come to you.” ~Mahatma Ghandi

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Blissful

Happiness is when what you think, what you say, and what you do are in harmony.” ~Mahatma Ghandi

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Beauty

Beauty is not in the face, beauty is a light in the heart.

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An Endless Wave of Transformation

As I’m writing this post,  still can’t believe that it has been two years since I’ve even visited or checked on things here.  So amazing how quickly time can slip away and that it seems to move at a faster and faster clip, especially when your not paying attention.

There have been so many changes in my life that I don’t even know where to begin!  Trying to recall  my last published topic of discussion.  Believe it was a mixture of the transition into yoga teacher training and always having an attitude of gratitude.

Taking the step into yoga teacher training was by far one of the best decisions in my life as well as the most nourishing and beneficial for myself as a whole.  An opportunity to learn, grow and blossom.  To develop new friendships and gain new sisters.   Wow…. just realized that I received my yoga certification two years ago…. feels like only yesterday.

Since then my days have been filled with teaching, friendships, and just an overall enjoyment of life.  Was grateful to have another teacher training opportunity with Manju Jois, which again was an experience that will always resonate in my heart.  A week of learning, as well as understanding on a deeper level about yoga and how the body works.  A fun and exciting time to say the least.

On another note, I lost a dog to cancer which was one of the saddest days.  If anyone has dogs, they understand they are family and you build a bond with them.  They are loving, loyal, affectionate and can be characters at times.  When you loose an animal it’s like losing a member of your family.

It’s been an interesting journey and every day is a new experience.  I have learned to be grateful for every breath as well as each day that I can enjoy this life!  There are times when life isn’t full of sunshine and ice cream, but those are the days where you take a few extra breaths and say to yourself,  this will pass.  I have to admit, sometimes the rough days are the ones where the paper bag comes in handy, because I might hyperventilate.  (just kidding)

Gratitude

May the long time sun shine upon you, all love surround you, and the pure and divine light within you, guide your way on, now and always.

Grateful for Everything

Create and Attitude of Gratitude All Day Long

 

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The secret to happiness and finding the enduring joy we all seek is Thanksgiving-the simple act of continually giving thanks.  To realize wonderful positive outcomes, up to and including seeming miracles, do one thing:  Show gratitude all day long.  Seeing everything in a new light, through a refreshing prism of love and appreciation, imparts a deep inner well of peace, calm and joy, making us feel more alive.

We can feel that way every day, in every aspect of life, awaking each morning excited to create the day ahead and enthusiastic about each moment and then falling asleep at night embracing a profound feeling of gratitude for all the good we know and have.  Happiness is contagious and becomes an upward spiral of joy naturally shared with others.

Start today by launching a daily gratitude journal.  This single action, the simplest and quickest way to get results, will foster a habit geared to change everything forever.  It fills up our love tank, sparks success and benefits everyone.  To embrace better relationships, health, clarity, life and tangible and intangible wealth:

  • Set a daily time for journal writing.
  • Pick a handful of things that prompt gratitude that day.  Perhaps begin with people that support you in some way.  Everything counts, from expressions of beauty to basic conveniences.  Eventually the daily list will grow, generating the joy of gratitude at ever-higher levels.
  • It’s important to write with love and joy, because such feelings create your world.  Even if something’s a work in progress, like encouraging steps in a relationship, focus on what makes you feel good and want more of and you’ll start seeing more evidence of them.
  • Elaborate in detail about a particular thing that earns extra gratitude.  This carries more benefits from intense feelings than creating a list.  When we see how blessed we are with what we already have, it creates more of what we are grateful for, generating and endless cycle of gratitude.
  • Take notice of the surprises and little miracles that occur, and be sure to make note of them to evoke an even stronger level of awe, and gratitude.
Robert Emmons, Ph.D., of the University of California-Davis, a leading authority in researching the science of gratitude and its impact on well-being, instructs his study participants, “Be aware of your feelings and how you ‘relish’ and ‘savor’ this gift in your imagination.  Take the time to be especially aware of the depth of your gratitude.”  In other words, don’t hurry through this exercise like a to-do list.
An all- day-long attitude of gratitude ramps up our awareness of life’s pleasures.  It takes an already good life to a whole new zone of zest.
Article by Mary Lynn Ziemer- a master of Advanced Life Concepts, certified life and business coach, motivational speaker and author, with more than 30 years as an entrepreneur and corporate executive at two Fortune 100 companies.  Connect at LivingAJoyfulLifeNow.com

Here’s to a Happy Tuesday

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Good morning friends!  It’s an amazing universe of information-the internet.  Was looking for images and quotes to wish you all a Happy Tuesday and found this!  Couldn’t help to post because it is just unique and have to admit, pretty hilarious!  Dogs are amazing, but I’m pretty sure my dogs could never pull this off.  But possibly could be an interesting experiment….hmmmm.

So Happy Tuesday everyone and to all the doggies….continue to be awesome!

 

Remembering and Honoring Labor Day

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In an era when Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker has made his name by attacking and destroying labor unions in his state, and New Jersey Governor Chris Christie has recently argued that the national teachers union deserves “a punch in the face,” remembering Labor Day’s true origins feels more important than ever. Even if we leave these partisan voices aside, our current moment represents the culmination of decades of rising anti-union sentiment among many Americans, a trend that has not coincidentally occurred alongside plummeting numbers in union membership.

The question of who is responsible for the creation of a holiday devoted to labor remains in some dispute. For many years it was attributed to Peter McGuire, a carpenter who became a national labor leader in the 1880s; recently historians have argued instead for Matthew Maguire, a machinist and leader of the New York Central Labor Union (CLU).

We do know that the holiday originated in the early 1880s, and the first parade was organized in New York by the CLU and the national union the Knights of Labor on September 5, 1882. In their inclusion of every type of worker, including unskilled and immigrant workers (the latter a particularly radical position in the era of the Chinese Exclusion Act and significant anti-immigrant trends in the labor movement), the Knights embodied one element of late 19th century labor radicalism, and their parades reflected this identity.

Yet in the years before it became a formalized or federal holiday, Labor Day was celebrated at different times and in diverse ways by distinct unions and organizations, and there were those who argued for a much more overtly radical element to the holiday: celebrating it on or around May 1, to link it overtly to the burgeoning international association between May Day and communist activism. Whether Peter McGuire first conceived of the holiday or not, both he and the newly formed American Federation of Labor (of which he became a national leader after its 1886 founding) were among those arguing in this decade for a more clearly international celebration, inspired in part by Toronto’s Labour Festival which McGuire had attended in 1882. Whenever the holiday was celebrated, it had the clear potential in these early years to reflect the labor movement’s more radical and activist sides.

Both the formalizing and federalizing of the holiday happened in direct response to such radical elements. The May 1886 Haymarket riots and bombing, and the fears of international radicalism that followed, led to President Grover Cleveland’s 1887 recognition of a September Labor Day celebration, the first such formal national acknowledgment of the holiday. (Ironically, it was to commemorate the Haymarket affair that the 1889 Paris Second International officially designated May 1 as International Workers’ Day, a holiday still celebrated around the world.) And the 1894 Pullman Strike, one of the broadest and most prominent national strikes of the period, led Congress and Cleveland (serving in his second, non-consecutive term as president) to go one step further—just six days after the strike ended, Cleveland signed the hastily drafted and passed legislation that made Labor Day a federal holiday, to be celebrated on the first Monday of September.

Like the American labor movement itself, these histories are messy, conflicted, include both triumphs and tragedies, aren’t easily boiled down into a straightforward narrative. But one clear takeaway is this: As with every victory achieved by the labor movement (including eight-hour workdays, the weekend, health protections, child labor laws, and numerous other successes), Labor Day would not exist without the movement’s more radical and activist elements and efforts. Remembering the holiday’s origins can thus help us not only celebrate all that the labor movement has achieved, but also recognize the continued need for radical activism.

Ben Railton is an Associate Professor of English and American Studies at Fitchburg State University and a member of the Scholars Strategy Network.